5 Trendy Alcohol-Free Drinks for Your Designated Driver on St. Patrick’s Day

Whenever you have a party involving designated drivers, it’s logical and often expected to include some alcohol-free drinks. If you are hosting a party at this year’s St. Patrick’s Day, don’t forget to include the following cocktails for your driving friends.

  1. Sunset Boulevard

Based on the same recipe as Tequila Sunrise, but without any alcohol (or Tequila), prepare them some Sunset Boulevard. Naturally, it contains no alcohol with a subtle taste of citrus for flavor.

Take a glass of ice and add a combination of various fruit juices. You will mix  30ml fresh lemon juice with 30ml fresh lime juice and end with 90ml orange juice. For an extra flavor, add 10ml grenadine and let the whole cocktail to rest – DO NOT STIR. Drink as you party the holiday away.

  1. The Virgin Mary

Your “Bloody booze” will be No-No, and your friends might have to put up with a safe, liquor free drink instead. If you haven’t figured out the best cocktail for your designated driving friends just yet, try making the Virgin Mary.

You need a quality tomato juice, freshly blend or a mixture of Clamato juice and tomato juice. Add a reasonable amount of sea salt and ground black pepper, four dashes of Tabasco sauce and three Worcestershire sauce dashes.

A squeeze of fresh lemon fruit and a few Bittermens Hellfire Habanero Shrub Bitters will give it a healthy kick. Adjust seasoning, find a straw, sit down and enjoy BREATHE FIRE!

  1. Basil and Mint Lemonade

Call it a herby sophisticated version of homemade lemonade, Basil, and Mint Lemonade is perfect for an alcohol-free drink during this Irish holiday.

To create a treat for 8-10 revelers, pop 175g caster sugar and nearly similar quantity of water into a saucepan over medium heat. Don’t allow it to boil and stir until the granules dissolve. Allow them to cool in a jug.

Once it’s cold, pour half of it into another jar and pour in half a glass of freshly squeezed lemon juice. Add some water and taste. You can add more syrup if you need to. Finally, pour into a blender having basil leaves and mint leaves and whizz until almost strain. Serve over ice.

  1. The Shirley Temple

A super CHEESY drink this holiday, grab a glass of the Shirley Temple and let your friends enjoy the party responsibly. To prepare, fill a glass with ice cubes and pour in ginger ale and 7-Up, 50/50. Add a dash of grenadine and lime juice and garnish with a fluorescent maraschino and enjoy.

  1. The Riderless Mule

If you love exotic cocktails, then you might have tasted or heard about the feisty Moscow Mule. A drink with a kick, unlike the Riderless Mule, perfect for an alcohol-free St. Patrick’s party. Just a glass of ice added some 30ml fresh lime juice and 90ml ginger beer, and you are ready to go. Stir and drink.

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5 Trendy New Green Cocktail Recipes for St. Patrick’s Day

In the Irish culture, the St. Patrick’s Day holiday is more than just a carnival – it serves to link the present with their history-rich past. Drinking is part of the celebration but it is not limited to beer.

Green Apple Ginger Martini

Enjoy a drink that includes that crispy flavor of green apples and spicy, fresh ginger. The cocktail mimics a traditional martini, but adds a fun, tasty touch.

Ingredients for two cocktails:

  • 4 oz. (120 ml) of ginger infused vodka – vodka with a piece of freshly grated ginger. Alternative: infuse a simple syrup with ginger for states that do not allow infused alcohol.
  • 4 oz. (120 ml) green apple lime juice: a large tart green apple, sliced into smaller pieces, 2 oz. (60 ml) water, and the juice of two small limes.
  • 0.5 oz. (15 ml) maple or honey syrup.
  • Crushed ice.

Instructions:

  1. Using 1.5 oz. of your already prepared ginger infused vodka and 2 oz. of your green apple lime juice, pour them together with 1 oz. of the honey syrup into a cocktail shaker filled with crushed ice and shake with vigor until it turns frosty.
  2. Strain into chilled glasses and enjoy!

 

Green Fizz Cocktail

Treat customers to a glass of cool, fruity and refreshing Green Fizz to celebrate the Irish culture.

Ingredients for 2 cocktails:

  • One peeled and cut Kiwi fruit (¼ inch slices)
  • ½ cored green apple, ¼ inch slices
  • 2 oz. Midori
  • 2 oz. quality vodka
  • 8 oz. water

Directions:

  1. Take two 12 oz. glass and fill to ⅔ with ice.
  2. To each glass, add apple and kiwi slices and ensure the apples go in first.
  3. Pour 1 oz. each Midori and vodka into each glass. Top with the water and gently stir. Add a straw and serve.

 

Cucumber Lime Punch

It’s another St. Patrick’s Day holiday, time to do some weird stuff. Consider a cocktail of Cucumber Lime Punch, using the following recipe.

Ingredients:

  • A tray of ice
  • 2 liters of lemon-lime soda
  • A 12-ounce Can frozen limeade
  • A cucumber, thinly sliced

Instructions:

  1. Using a large bowl, filled with ice, add lemon soda and frozen limeade.
  2. Add sliced cucumbers and stir till limeade melts away.
  3. Store in a fridge for 1 hour to marinate the flavors.

 

Sparkling Leprechaun Kiss Drink

A sparkling green or Grinch cocktail, sour and easy to make.

Ingredients:

  • Sour Apple Pucker – 1 oz.
  • 0.5 oz. Vodka
  • Lemon juice 1 oz.
  • simple syrup 0.5 oz.
  • Green tea  1 oz.
  • Ice
  • green colored sugar for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Wet the glass’ edge with water and roll in the green sugar to coat the rim
  2. Pour ice into the glass – halfway
  3. Pour all the ingredients (except soda) into a shaker and mix via shaking
  4. Pour the mixture over ice and top using lemon soda

 

Irish Mojito

Yes! St. Paddy’s Day is here and whether you are Irish or not, the moment is worth celebrating if you have a glass of this famous cocktail – Irish Mojito.

You need:

  • A fresh and juicy lime
  • Fresh mint leaves
  • 1 oz. vodka or rum
  • Sugar or simple syrup (1 tsp. to 1 Tbsp.)
  • Ice
  • 1 oz. Creme de Menthe

Directions:

  1. Cut and squeeze one lime into a cocktail shaker
  2. Add some few mint leaves, fresh.
  3. Muddle them in the shaker.
  4. Pour in the rum or vodka.
  5. Sprinkle in the sugar to taste
  6. Add some ice and shake well
  7. Strain into a martini glass
  8. Add a little of Creme de Menthe and let it calm for a few minutes.
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Negligence With The Retail Sale Of Alcohol

When you think about the responsibility that comes with serving alcohol, you would expect there to be laws in place that allow injured people to sue an establishment that serves alcohol if that establishment was irresponsible with its sales. Thankfully, there are laws in place to protect against irresponsible alcohol serving establishments and those laws are called Dram Shop laws.

With Dram Shop laws, a person who was involved in a car accident where they were hit by someone who was driving while intoxicated can sue the bar that served the other driver if the situation meets the right criteria. Dram Shop laws are complicated, so you will need an experienced attorney to help you use these laws if you need to.

Two Types Of Dram Shop Laws

The two types of Dram Shop laws are first-party and third-party laws. In the first-party Dram Shop laws, the person who was intoxicated can sue the bar they were drinking at if it can be proven that the bar served the person past the point of intoxication, or if the person was visibly intoxicated when they entered the establishment and got served anyways. In a third-party case, someone who was injured as the direct result of the negligence of the alcohol serving establishment can sue the establishment. For example, if someone was hit by an intoxicated driver and the situations regarding the driver getting served alcohol are the same as the first-party scenario, then the person who was hit can sue the bar.

In the state of New York, third-party Dram Shop laws are used to help a victim get the compensation they deserve. As long as the intoxicated person was either underage, served while they were visibly drunk, or served to the point where they were visibly drunk, the victim has a case.

Dram Shop Lawsuits Versus Personal Injury Lawsuits

Dram Shop lawsuits, for all intents and purposes, are personal injury lawsuits. Personal injury lawsuits according to BanvilleLaw.com, are lawsuits filed because of another person’s carelessness that led to your injuries.

The biggest difference between the two is an extra step involved in filing a Dram Shop lawsuit. A person who intends to file a Dram Shop lawsuit in New York must notify the bar within 60 days of the incident that they intend to take action. After that, the usual statutes of limitations for personal injury lawsuits are put in place.

Visibly Drunk

It is relatively simple to prove that someone was underage at the time of their intoxication, but proving someone was visibly drunk is a little more difficult. In New York State, a person is considered “visibly intoxicated” when they have:

  • Slurred speech
  • Loss of physical coordination
  • Blood shot eyes

It sounds cut and dry, but the hard part is proving in a court of law after months have passed since the incident that the person in question was in that condition when they were served by the alcohol establishment. Short of taking pictures of every customer that is served, alcohol establishments would have no record of something like that. Since the burden of proof is on the plaintiff, these cases can be hard to win.

In New York State, the Dram Shop laws are set up to hold alcohol selling establishments responsible when they serve someone who is underage, visibly drunk, or serving them to the point of being visibly drunk. It is important to remember that Dram Shop laws only apply to the alcohol selling establishment. If you want to sue the intoxicated person as well, that would be a separate personal injury lawsuit.

With the difficulty involved in winning Dram Shop cases and the potential for multiple lawsuits, it is important to hire a very experienced attorney for your case. If you do find yourself the victim of a negligent bar or restaurant, then do not hesitate to use the Dram Shop laws to protect your rights.

Author Bio:

Laurence Banville. Esq is the managing partner and face of Banville Law. Laurence is licensed to practice law in the state of New York. Originally from Ireland, Banville moved to the United States of America where he worked at law firms, refining his litigation and brief writing crafts. He is also the recipient of the Irish Legal 100 and the Top 40 Under 40 awards.

 

 

 

 

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Beware of Employee Agreements

 

Many employees sign confidentiality and non-compete agreements when accepting a new job. While the stack of on-boarding paperwork for a new job seems routine, the obligations included in these non-compete agreements are anything but routine.

Employees must carefully understand and consider the obligations imposed by these agreements, especially because they generally apply whether an employee voluntarily terminates employment or the employer involuntarily terminates the employee. In other words, re-employment options are restricted whether you quit or are fired.

What can you do? The employee can try to narrow the scope of the non-compete agreement so that if it protects the new employer’s interests but does not impose unreasonable restrictions that could hamper the ability to find a new job. Revisions can also be added to specify competitors that the non-compete applies to rather than an entire industry. A non-compete will be unenforceable if it inhibits an employee’s ability to earn a living because there are no realistic employment options given the non-compete’s restrictions. The non-compete will be more enforceable against an employee who leaves to start up a competitor business.

Employees should carefully review any agreements he or she will be required to sign to accept the job, reflect on its impact, and seek professional advice if concerns arise.

             Tracy_JongAbout Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

 

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Profit Tip For Breweries

Profit Tip to breweries: Hops infused oil adds a depth of flavor to sandwiches, salads and other foods to perfectly complement craft beer. Farm breweries are permitted to sell agriculture and tourism related products. Hops infused oils offer a perfect beer complementary food product for foodies and beer enthusiasts. You can produce your proprietary infused oil in-house or have it made for you by private label contract manufacturing.  If you serve food, feature the oil on your menu.

Work with local restaurants and ask them to use your brand of hops infused oil and feature it on their menu. Even better, have them sell it at the register or use it in a social media promotion. It is perfect for salad dressings, meat marinates, and sauces. Beer and meat are the perfect combination. Upgrade the flavor experience by using the same hops to prepare the food.

 

 

            Tracy_Jong About Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

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New York Soft Pouch Beer & Wine

There are many options for packaging craft beverages these days. The use of soft pouches is attractive from a cost perspective and it provides a great branding opportunity. Visually distinctive product packaging is key for prospective customers to find your product on the shelf quickly and easily. Customers will turn to other brands if they can’t locate your product. Two things to know if you use soft pouches for your craft beverages:

  • Labeling must not contain any statement, design, device, representation that is likely to mislead a consumer.
  • The New York State Liquor Authority opines that soft pouches inherently have the ability to confuse people. These pouches look like “Capri Sun” and other juice beverages typically given to children. To address this, soft pouches must contain the statement: “CONTAINS ALCOHOL—NO SALES UNDER 21”

 

Source: ABCL 107(a)

Advisory 2014-7 (April 10,2014)

 

           Tracy_Jong  About Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

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Is Your Craft Beverage Production Facility In Compliance With the Clean Water Act?

D.G. Yuengling and Son Inc. settled with the EPA relating to 141 alleged Clean Water Act (CWA) violations where it will pay $2.8 million in fines. The Pennsylvania brewery will pay $2.8 million penalty, plus approximately $7 million in promised wastewater system improvements. The company operates two brewery facilities and both failed to comply with industrial user permit limits on wastewater discharges that went to the local municipal wastewater collection and treatment system. More specifically, the charges state that the brewery wastewater exceeded the discharge limits for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), phosphorous, zinc and pH. This could negatively impact the entire public municipal wastewater system. When the wasre streams exceed allowable limits, wastewater streams must be pretreated by the brewery before being discharged into the local municipal system.

To avoid future violations, the brewery agreed to wastewater system updates including designing and implementing an environmental management system (EMS) focused on CWA compliance, improving and installing a comprehensive pretreatment system, hiring two certified wastewater treatment operators and implementing a process to identify, investigate and respond to future CWA violations.

The average water use ratio for a brewery is about 7:1, that is, seven gallons of water are consumed for each gallon of beer produced. (The other six gallons are primarily going down the drain.) While brewery wastewater is not generally toxic or hazardous, it can contain low levels of biocides and metals, and higher levels of biodegradable materials, that can be problematic for municipal wastewater treatment plants. Without pretreatment, brewery wastewater may exceed regulatory discharge limits for some parameters such as pH, metals and phosphorus. As a result, brewery wastewater can be more costly for the municipality to treat and can increase the quantity of sludge needing disposal.

What does this mean for your microbrewery?

  1. Evaluate what is going down the drain and where it goes.
  2. If the discharge is into the local municipal sewer system, then determine if you must obtain an industrial user wastewater permit.
  3. If you are put under formal permit or contract with the EPA or DEC, then evaluate whether your untreated wastewater can consistently comply with those requirements or if onsite pretreatment is required.

Making beer is fun but you must keep in mind you are in an industrial food production business and there are environmental regulations to comply with. Failure to do so can lead to very significant fines and penalties. Working with an environmental engineer or experienced craft beverage or environmental attorney can help you navigate the regulations and ensure your operations are in compliance.

       

          Tracy_Jong   About Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

Posted in Hot Topics: Liquor Law & Licensing, Liquor Stores, Microbreweries & Microdistilleries, Restaurants, Wineries | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What to do if your building has more than one legal address

The Authority is now requiring that the address appearing on the license, bond and lease match the 911 system and the deed for the property. This can be confusing when it differs from the mailing address for the leased premises.

Let’s look at an example. A corner multiple unit commercial building in Canandaigua has two street level commercial retail units along Beeman Street, 5 and 7 Beeman Street and one street level commercial retail unit along Main Street, 195 Main Street. It also has several residential apartment units on the second floor 6A, 6B and 6C. In this situation, the lease, bond and licensed premises must be “5-7 Beeman Street; 195 Main Street” as recited on the deed.

Let’s look at another example. A downtown multiple unit commercial building in LeRoy has two street level commercial retail units at  7 and 9 Main Street. The deed for the building lists the property as  7, 9, 11, and 13 Main Street. It also has several residential apartment units on the second floor. The street address for 7 Main Street will be a farm brewery. The street address at 9 Main Street will be an adjacent restaurant. In this situation, the lease, bond and licensed premises must be “7-13 Main Street, unit 7 Main Street” for the brewery and “7-13 Main Street, unit 9 Main Street” for the restaurant.

If the building has more than one legal address, the Authority requests that applicants additionally submit one or more of the following supporting documents with the original application:

  • All property tax bills for the building
  • Letter from 911 system verifying the address(es) in its system for the building as a whole
  • Deed for the building
  • Letter from the Post Office verifying mailing addresses associated with the building

The Examiner may request additional documentation at his or her discretion.

 

 

 

 

 

            Tracy_JongAbout Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

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Rochester rated number 10 in America for female entrepreneurs- five reasons I agree.

A small business lending group, Merchant Cash USA, ranked Rochester a great city for female small business owners, sharing the top ten with Portland, San Antonio, Atlanta, Houston and Raleigh. For many of us women- owned Rochester businesses, this is no secret. Let me share some of the reasons my business lives this fact every day.

  1. There are so many resources to help small businesses right here in Rochester. We have world-class talent at our doorstep. Whatever you need, I’ll bet you’ll find it here in town.
  2. We are lucky to have strong business coaching services and groups like TAB and Vistage. I did not know what a business coach was or that I could benefit from one until a colleague convinced me to give it a try. Now I couldn’t imagine facing business challenges without the help of other business owners and a professional coach as my accountability partner.
  3.  There is support for female business leaders. If you are good at what you do, there is opportunity. Being female won’t hold you back in Rochester.
  4. There are strong networking and professional groups waiting for your involvement. These are not just places to potentially get business, they are places to meet like-minded individuals and people you can call on when you face a particularly difficult challenge or when you want to run an idea past someone to check your sanity.
  5. There is room for women and businesses of all sizes and shapes. I genuinely mean that you can be successful just for being good at what you do- no need for pretense; you can work from home or have a virtual business and be as successful as businesses with brick and mortar storefronts. You can look like someone who just left the salon or be a middle-aged mother and still attract business because of your skills.

If you have been considering starting a business, there is no time like the present. Hey, if you need help, give me a call. Been there. Done that.

 

Tracy_JongAbout Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed intellectual property and patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a monthly publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

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Alternating Proprietorship and Participation of Host in Tenant’s Operations

If I have an alternating proprietorship, Can I use the host’s staff as independent contractors to assist me in alcoholic beverage production?

Yes, as long as the written agreement between the Host and Tenant provides for this situation and it is structured to be compliant with federal law. The key factors that the TTB will consider in evaluating the relationship include:

Authority of the “independent contractor” and

Who makes operational decisions?

The proprietor whose product is being manufactured must exercise its own decision-making authority. The Host’s employees may be consultants to the proprietor, but may not be the ultimate decision-maker. This is especially the case for day to day operational matters such as bottling, storage and management of the operations. To be compliant, the tenant producer must issue written work orders and operational guidelines. It is acceptable for the proprietor to give limited discretion and authority to the consultant, but it must retain ultimate decision-making control for itself.

Similarly, auditors and inspectors should be able to discuss all records and reports with the principals of the Tenant business. The Tenant proprietor cannot abdicate its responsibility to prepare records and reports, or to pay taxes, to an independent contractor’s employees or consultants. Doing so will be a violation for “inadequate control.”

It is important that the Tenant producer have separate records. A subaccount of the host’s records will not be adequate. The Tenant must independently have access and control of its separate records, without going through the account or records of another business. (Yes, a separate user ID is needed and will have to be purchased for internet web-based systems). Cooperation is a core value and practice within the craft beverage industry. However; the road ends here at record keeping. These duties are required of each business separately. Failure to comply is completely at the liability and responsibility of the Tenant for its operations at the altering premises. Getting caught risks the license and/or some hefty fines.

The last area of concern is with payment for the services. Many arrangements provide for a trade in product rather than a cash payment. While this is permissible, it’s a taxable payment that must be recorded on the books and all appropriate payroll and income taxes paid.

Owning and Operating a Brewery, Cidery, Distillery & Winery has become an Increasingly Nuanced Profession

Regulations, licensure and legal risks are always evolving, and working with an attorney who is up to date on the latest strategies is essential for advising you how to minimize and maximize opportunities.

Schedule your Business Strategy Session with by emailing our office at team@tracyjonglawfirm.com today

 

 

 

             Tracy_JongAbout Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong has been an attorney for more than 20 years,      representing restaurants, bars, and craft beverage manufacturers in a wide array of legal matters. She is also a licensed patent attorney.

Her book Everything You Need To Know About Obtaining and Maintaining a New York Retail Liquor License: The Definitive Guide to Navigating the State Liquor Authority will be available next month on Amazon.com as a softcover and Kindle e-book.

Her legal column is available in The Equipped Brewer, a publication giving business advice, trends, and vendor reviews to help craft breweries, cideries, distilleries and wineries build brands and succeed financially.

She also maintains a website and blog with practical information on legal and business issues affecting the industry. Follow her, sign up for her free firm app or monthly newsletter.

www.TracyJongLawFirm.com

TJong@TracyJongLawFirm.com

Facebook: Tracy Jong Law Firm

Twitter:      @TJLawFirm

LinkedIn:   Tracy Jong

Tracy Jong Law Firm

 

 

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